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OJ Simpson to be Released From Prison This Fall?

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Hall of Fame running back OJ Simpson, after being convicted of several very serious crimes – none having to do with murdering Nicole Brown-Simpson and Ron Goldman – could be a free man soon, according to a credible legal analyst, Michael McCann

Simpson was sentenced to 33 years in prison with a chance for parole after nine years, notes Sports Illustrated. In 2013, OJ Simpson faced a parole board for five of his 12 charges. In an impassioned speech, he reported his positive influence at Lovelock Correctional Center which ranged from mopping the floors to coaching prison-yard sports. Simpson was granted parole for the counts in question.

OJ Simpson

He was found guilty in 2008 on 12 different counts, including burglary, robbery, kidnapping and assault with a deadly weapon, during a confrontation in a Las Vegas hotel room, in which he and five other people attempted to steal hundreds of items of sports memorabilia.

NOTE TO EVERYONE: Don’t commit a crime in Las Vegas. They don’t like it. You don’t get friendly media coverage, cameras, dream team lawyers and a circus trial. You just go straight to “pound-me-in-the-a*ss” prison” because the people who run Vegas mean it when they say “family friendly”!!

They don’t like bad news about “some big-ass football player might be coming down the hall with a gun” stories in the national news – so despite the fact that OJ got away with basically cutting his ex’s head off, he’s in a Las Vegas prison cell as we speak.

Pretty sure the killer went that-away..

The Juice will face the board again in July and McCann, who is also a law professor at the University of New Hampshire, says OJ has good odds at being on the street with an early release in October. “The decision to grant parole is, by definition, discretionary,” McCann says.

Wow! Note to OJ: Don’t go near Ron Goldman’s father. That dude is still holding a grudge is my guess.

I covered that “trial of the century” gavel-to-gavel as part of “Camp OJ” in Los Angeles and because we basically all lived there 24/7 – all we were exposed to was the evidence. The overwhelming evidence of overwhelming, undoubtable, incontrovertible guilty on all counts of premeditated double-aggravated murder in the First Degree.

Nobody was more surprised than the press when that verdict came in. I believe Jerry Seinfeld put it the best: “Do you have Ron Goldman’s blood in your car?”

OJ Simpson

The verdict comes in. If only OJ had a football to spike!

No doubt it was jury nullification and maybe you truly believe it was right to let a black guy go because of the history of the legal system. Ok, but OJ Simpson didn’t hang out with black people, he didn’t live in a black neighborhood, he didn’t date or marry any black women – he didn’t even like black people. I can’t put myself in your shoes, but letting OJ go did nothing to solve race relations and I don’t have the answers to that problem either.

But I know this: Racism won’t cure racism.

By the way, you think blacks are angry with cops now? HAH! You should have been in LA 20 years ago. Sadly, rioter and looters burned their own neighborhoods down and killed 62 people – mostly blacks – but man, the anger made Ferguson look like child’s play and for a while there the cops didn’t even intervene. It was mayhem.

My apartment complex burned to the ground and I spent the rest of the time watching the riots from the Burbank Holiday Inn. If you ever visit, I highly recommend Gordon Biersch restaurant and brewery right down the street. I spent a fortune there, but awesome beer and food.

Anywhoozer, truth is – I hope they let OJ Simpson go, because that guy cannot shut his piehole and he’ll be on TV, playing golf, doing talk shows and soon enough, he’s going to say something that only the killer would know – you watch. And we’ll all look at each other and say – “I knew it!!” duh..

Let’s just be honest about it, okay? That will do more for race relations than anything.

Sources: Sports Illustrated, The New York Times / Photo credit: Gerald Johnson/Wikimedia Commons

 

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